Ready for change

In today’s modern world the only constant is change.

Discover some simple ways you can prepare for the unexpected and navigate a rapidly changing world.

What’s the best part of being a millennial?

You’ve seen the headlines. With rising house prices and financial instability, it’s not easy being a millennial.

But there are still plenty of unique opportunities to take control of your future and live a fulfilled and happy life.


What‘s your most valuable asset?

It’s not your home or your car. Your most valuable asset is you.

Horizon Research has found that 1 in 7 households are likely to experience a serious illness that will leave them unable to work for 3 months or more*.

So it’s important that you protect what matters most – your ability to earn an income.


Protect yourself

What will happen to your money when you die?

The answer is probably not what you think. If you don’t have a will, your money won’t necessarily go straight to your partner or children.

Unfortunately many New Zealanders don’t have a will. But it’s easy to get sorted - and it may not cost you as much as you think.


Tips on creating a will

Looking after your family

None of us like to think about death, but should the worst happen, it’s comforting to know that those dearest to us will be looked after.

A will is designed to give you peace of mind. It sets out how your money and property will be dealt with after death.

Keeping up to date

Depending on which stage of your life you create your will, you may need to revisit this document as your circumstances change. Here are three things to be mindful of as you journey through life:

  1. If you get married, any will you had prepared before marriage will no longer be valid
  2. The last will you signed – even if it’s out of date – will be the one used if you die
  3. Wills aren’t just about what you leave to people – they can also identify the person you want to look after your children (or pets)

Protecting your future

Unfortunately, there may come a time, where through illness or injury, you are unable to make your own decisions. An enduring power of attorney is a legal document which sets out who can take care of your personal or financial matters if you can't.

The person who you elect to make decisions for you is called your ‘Attorney’. You are referred to as the ‘Donor’. Should the worst happen, an Enduring Power of Attorney can save your family the cost and stress of having to get a court order to make decisions about you and your property and finances.

Start today

We want every Kiwi to have peace of mind – secure in the knowledge that should the worst happen, their family will be looked after. That’s why we’re teaming up with Footprint to offer wills from $100. Visit http://myfootprint.co.nz.

Important information

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The information included in this video is of a general nature, is the opinion of Blair Vernon, and is not a substitute for financial or other professional advice. To the extent that the information constitutes advice, it is class advice only. Before taking any action, you should always seek financial advice or other professional advice relevant to your personal circumstances. For personal financial advice, we recommend you contact your Adviser or if you don't have an Adviser, contact us on 0800 267 263 and we can put you in touch with one. A copy of your Adviser's disclosure statement is available, on request and free of charge.

The information in this video is of a general nature only and reflects the opinions of the presenter as at the time of release (September 2018). It is no substitute for personalised advice. If you would like advice that takes into account your particular financial situation or goals, please contact your Financial Adviser. Your Adviser has a disclosure statement that is available on request and free of charge. While care has been taken to ensure that the information in this video is accurate, no entity or person gives any warranty of reliability or accuracy or accepts any responsibility arising in any way including from any error or omission.